Randomised controlled trials (referred to as trials in this article) that are well designed, conducted, and reported have a central role in evaluating interventions’ efficacy or effectiveness and potential harms.1 The design and conduct of trials should be clearly described in a protocol, including information on ethical considerations, study rationale, methods, and post-trial provisions, among other details.23 Protocols are essential documents used by various stakeholders: to guide and document study conduct by trial teams; and for appraisal of the planned trial by funders, ethical approval committees, journal editors (and peer reviewers), regulatory and health technology assessment agencies, among other stakeholders.2 The inadequate reporting of trials, from the protocol to the final trial results, greatly contributes to the growing issue of research waste.45 Consequently, reporting guidelines are key interventions to ensure adequate reporting of trial elements, meeting the needs of various stakeholders2 and contributing to a reduction in research waste.5 The…